An ODE -PORIFERAL PHASES (2020)

Kunstlerhaus Bethanien Berlin Germany

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Artist Anna Rún Tryggvadóttir ́s performative sculptures are patient teachers who show us how we are shaped by the reality we create for ourselves and bring our awareness to our relationship with nature. They ask us what it means to bring nature indoors and which elements in us are nurtured by wanting to be immersed in nature. The works share a silent roar, sounds of movement, similar to that which we can hear from the inside of our body, to the outside.

The situations and objects that Tryggvadóttir creates want to perform. They are very present and feel like moving. They have a longing for kinesis. Scaling occurs as we move between the synthetic and the natural, objects of different sizes and ages, some made last month, others formed millions of years ago. The objects each have vibrations in as it seems altering states as part of an installation of becoming. Liquid runs dry, resulting in salt residue.
In the world of arresting objects, brought together and assembled by Tryggvadóttir from various realities, an inner logic is developed that has engaging qualities, maneuvering the elements. It is a kind of reversed alchemy in dialogue with ancient times when the most knowledgeable people on earth were at once a philosopher, healer, mathematician, physician, theologist and alchemist, and to whom the fundamental understanding of the crossovers of those knowledge-meridians were the very fertile ground to be explored.

 

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